Employee Benefits Statistics

  • 79% of employers believe offering benefits to employees is a critical component of attracting talent (Burson Marsteller)
  • 59% of employees say employee benefits are “very important” to how they feel about their job and their employer, 36% said benefits are “somewhat important (One Medical)
  • 69% of employees report that they might choose one job over another if it offered better benefits (One Medical)
  • The United States is projected to have an average of 2.7% actual wage growth (accounting for inflation) in 2016, the largest increase in three years (KFHG)
  • 42% of employees say improving their benefits package is one thing their employers could do to keep them in their jobs; the second most mentioned after “increase my salary” (Aflac)
  • US businesses are planning to boost pay by around 3% on average in 2017, the same as 2016 (WorldatWork)
  • 70% of HR leaders say they’ll have to pay workers increased wages as the the talent pool thins (CareerBuilder)
  • 20% of organizations have plans to offer higher starting salaries going into the second part of 2016, by as much as 5% higher; 53% plan to raise starting salaries by more than 5% (CareerBuilder)
  • 60% of hiring managers report job seekers are asking for more money compared to six months ago. In healthcare, this rises to 66% (DHI Group)
  • 19% of employers say their employees have a high level of understanding their benefits (IFEBP)
  • 80% of organizations report low benefits knowledge due to participants not opening/reading materials, almost half don’t understand the materials, and 31% say participants do not perceive value in their benefits (IFEBP)
  • 62% of all employees look to their employers for help in achieving financial security through employee benefits (MetLife)
  • 16% of employees have left a job or turned down a job in the last 12 months due to the benefits offered (Aflac)
  • 96% of employees who are satisfied with their benefits are satisfied with their jobs (Aflac)
  • 36% of employees say improving their benefits package is one thing their employer could do to keep them in their jobs (Aflac)
  • 15% of Gen Z and 19% of Millennials say health care is the most important employee benefit (Future Workplace)
  • 86% of Millennials state they value having benefits personalized to meet their individual circumstances and age (MetLife)
  • 96% of millennials say great health-care benefits are important in choosing a job, more important than frequent raises (94%) and promotions (82%) (Bentley University)
  • 64% of millennials say benefits are extremely or very important to employer loyalty (Aflac)
  • Perks Millennials prefer from employers: flexible schedules (70%), good benefits (60%) (NSHSS)
  • 54% of employees choose “benefits and paid time off” as what drives engagement most (Namely)
  • 60% of mid-size executives rank “benefits and paid time off” as having the best ROI (Namely)
  • 15% of employees have left or turned down a job due to the benefits it offered in the last 12 months (Aflac)
  • 46% of employees who are satisfied with their benefits are likely to look for new jobs in the next 12 months (compared to 57% of those who are unsatisfied) (Aflac)
  • 60% of employees are likely to take a job with lower pay but better benefits (Aflac)
  • 43% of employees have medical coverage through their job and only 33% have a 401(k) plan through their company (Jobvite)
  • The $25,826 in healthcare costs for a typical family of four covered by an employer-sponsored preferred provider plan is $1,155 higher than last year (Milliman Medical Index)
  • Of that $25,826, employers pay $14,793, or 57% – a 4% decrease from 2001 (Milliman Medical Index)
  • Medical insurers project the healthcare benefits costs to rise by 9.1% in 2016, an increase from 8.0% in 2015 and 7.5% in 2014 (Willis Towers Watson)
  • Overall cost increases of healthcare benefits will hold steady at 6% in 2017 (NGBH)
  • 57% of organizations offer health benefits to at least some of their employees (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 87% of midsize employers offer PPO health coverage (BenefitFocus)
  • 34% of employees at midsize companies go with a HDHP option (BenefitFocus)
  • Among employers with 50+ full-time employees, 4% reported switching full-time employees to part time status (4%), changing part-time workers to full-time workers (10%), reducing the number of full-time employees they intended to hire (5%) or increasing waiting periods (2%) in response to the employer shared responsibility provision which took effect for some firms in 2015 (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 86% of employers using independent contractors do so for cost-saving purposes such as taxes and benefits (Burson Marsteller)
  • 58% of employers say full-time hires are better for their company because they provide more value over the long-term despite having to pay more up-front on taxes and benefits (Burson Marsteller)
  • 54% of On-Demand Economy workers believe they should receive more benefits as part of their job (Burson Marsteller)
  • 66% of employers feel they should not be responsible for providing benefits to independent contractors (Burson Marsteller)
  • 50% of employers don’t think they should be responsible for providing training or education to independent contractors (Burson Marsteller)
  • 80% of employers who hire independent contractors offer healthcare benefits to full-time, W2-based employees, only 17% offer those same benefits to independent contractors (Burson Marsteller)
  • 31% of large firms offering health benefits provide an incentive to complete a health risk assessment (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 91% of employees would engage in healthier behaviors if they were rewarded (Welltok)
  • 64% of employees say they believe that keeping employees healthy should be one of the top goals of a company’s benefits program (One Medical)
  • 59% of organizations have offered the same amount of benefits over the past year; 35% have increased their benefits, 7% decreased (SHRM)
  • 77% of organizations saw increases in their costs after ACA (SHRM)
  • 85% of employers say the ACA would have an impact on their workplace in the next 12 months (Littler)
  • Top concerns of HR and finance execs: employee wellness and productivity (83%), cost management (76%), ACA compliance (58%) (HUB)
  • 64% of HR and finance execs say that ACA compliance would cause them to struggle to stay in business (HUB)
  • 53% benefits executives ranked investment volatility as one of their top three current retirement plan risks, while 49% ranked retirement benefit costs as a top concern (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 47% of employers worry about regulatory compliance (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 31% of all employers, and 50% of large organizations, had their retirement plans audited by the federal government over the past two years (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 97% of finance executives still have “significant concerns” with benefits costs (HUB)
  • 65% of HR and finance execs believe they are doing all they can to rein in rising benefits costs (Hub International)
  • 32% of finance executives expect HR to go over budget (Hub International)
  • 24% of employers only offer high-deductible health plans, doubling the percentage from 2012 (PwC)
  • 24% of workers were enrolled in high-deductible health plans in 2015, up from 20% in 2014 (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 87% of midsize employers offer PPO health coverage (BenefitFocus)
  • 34% of employees at midsize companies go with a HDHP option (BenefitFocus)
  • 40% of Millennials over age 26 opt in to HDHPs (BenefitFocus)
  • PPO plans remain the most common plan type, enrolling 52% of covered workers in 2015 (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • Wages increased 1.9% and inflation declined by 0.2% from 2014 to 2015 (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • For single coverage, 61% of covered workers are in plans that require them to make a contribution of less than or equal to a quarter of the total premium, 2% are in plans that require more than half of the premium, and 16% are in plans that require no contribution at all (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • For family coverage, 44% of covered workers are in plans that require them to make a contribution of less than or equal to a quarter of the total premium and 15% are in plans that require more than half of the premium, while only 6% are in plans that require no contribution at all (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 81% of covered workers have a general annual deductible for single coverage (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 68% of covered workers have a copay for office visits with a primary care or specialist physician, in addition to any general annual deductible (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 99% of covered workers are in a plan that covers some prescription drugs (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 12% of covered workers enrolled in a plan with prescription drug coverage are enrolled in a plan with a separate annual drug deductible that applies only to prescription drugs (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • Opioid abusers cost employers nearly twice as much ($19,450) in medical expenses on average annually as non-abusers ($10,853) (Castlight)
  • 98% of covered workers are in plans with an out-of-pocket maximum for single coverage, significantly more than the 88% in 2013 (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 47% of employers with 3 to 9 workers offer health insurance coverage (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 23% of large firms that offer health benefits in 2015 also offer retiree health benefits (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • One in four U.S. employees expect to work beyond age 70 (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 17% of small firms and 74% of large firms offer the option of contributing to a flexible spending account (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • In 2015, 13% of large employers and 42% of small employers automatically enroll eligible employees (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 63% of covered workers are enrolled in a plan that is either partially or completely self-funded (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 33% of companies offer cash compensation to their own employees who waive medical and drug insurance, an average of $2,083 (Conrad Siegel)
  • 5% of large employers reported that they intend to reduce the number of full-time employees that they intend to hire because of the cost of providing health care benefits (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • Employees who are very satisfied w/ benefits are almost 4x more likely to be very satisfied with their jobs (MetLife)
  • 31.6% of total employee compensation costs were accounted for by benefits (SHRM)
  • In 2015, the average annual premiums for employer-sponsored health insurance were $6,251 for single coverage and $17,545 for family coverage, up 4% over 2014 (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 65% of employees have $1,000 or less to pay unexpected out-of-pocket medical expenses (Aflac)
  • 59% say they wouldn’t be able to adjust to the large financial costs associated with a serious injury or illness (Aflac)
  • 44% of employees say they would have to borrow from their 401(k)s or use credit cards to cover unexpected out-of-pocket expenses (Aflac)
  • 55% of employees in lower-income households (less than $50,000 in household income per year) are not prepared to pay for costs associated with an unanticipated serious illness or accident not covered by major medical insurance (Aflac)
  • 60% of employees said the top issues concerning them are increasing out-of-pocket medical expenses or the increasing cost of major medical or health insurance over maintaining their health benefits or the possibility of their employer eliminating spouse coverage (Aflac)
  • In 2015, 52% of employers did not offer coverage to spouses of employees eligible for workplace health care coverage, as opposed to 31% of companies reporting in 2014 (Conrad Siegel)
  • 25% of employees have had difficulty paying a medical bill due to high medical costs (Aflac)
  • 38% of consumers with employee-provided insurance coverage asked about an alternative treatment because of costs (PWC)
  • 81% believe the medical costs they are responsible for will increase (Aflac)
  • 61% of employees are worried about having enough money to meet out-of-pocket medical costs that are not covered by health insurance (MetLife)
  • Just 16% of employees who are satisfied with their benefits are likely to put off a medical procedure longer than they should (Aflac)
  • 79% of employees see a growing need for voluntary insurance today compared to last year (Aflac)
  • 87% of companies offer voluntary benefits (Employee Benefit News)
  • 50% of companies agree that “voluntary benefits are a significant part of our company’s benefits strategy” (MetLife)
  • 19% of employers say taking care of my employees by offering the widest range of benefits options is the most important objective of their benefits programs (Aflac)
  • 65% of organizations say educating employees about their benefits is a high priority (IFEBP)
  • Nearly two in five organizations have budgets specifically devoted to benefits communication and 25% are planning to increase those budgets in 2016 (IFEBP)
  • 26% of employers are interested in outsourcing employee benefits communications services to a third party (Aflac)
  • Platforms employers are using to communicate about benefits: (IFEBP)
    • Educational materials printed and mailed to homes—89%
    • Email—73%
    • Printed and distributed on site—69%
    • Internal websites—66%
    • External websites—58%
  • 36% of employers understand health care reform legislation extremely or very well (Aflac)
  • 34% of employees have children under 18 covered on their health plans (Aflac)
  • 51% of employees are extremely or very satisfied with their benefits packages (Aflac)
  • 77% of organizations review their benefits programs annually, and 11% review them even more frequently (SHRM)
  • 15% of organizations offered specific retention bonuses to executive-level employees, and 15% offered them to nonexecutive employees (SHRM)
  • 74% of employees want better benefits (BambooHR)
  • 62% of employees would leave a job for better benefits (Care.com)
  • 79% of employees would prefer new or additional benefits to a pay increase (Glassdoor)
  • 21% of Millennials define a good work environment as a place that offers incentives and perks (Staples)
  • US businesses spend $90 billion a year on non-cash incentives, up 17% from 2013 (Incentive Federation)
  • 84% of U.S. businesses use some form of non-cash incentive awards, which includes incentive travel, merchandise, gift cards, and award points (Incentive Federation)
  • 46% of Millenials say more office perks would improve their happiness (Staples)
  • Employees aged 18-34 (89%) and 35-44 (84%) prefer benefits or perks to pay raises, compared to those aged 45-54 (70%) and 55-64 (66%) (Glassdoor)
  • 50% of employees cite benefits as an important reason they remain with their current employer (MetLife)
  • 70% say that benefits that can be customized to meet their needs would increase their loyalty to their employers (MetLife)
  • At companies where employees are offered no benefits, only 46% of employees would recommend their employers as great places to work (MetLife)
  • At companies offering 1-5 benefits, 53% would recommend their employers as great places to work (MetLife)
  • At companies offering 11 or more benefits, 66% would recommend their employers as great places to work (MetLife)
  • 87% of employers say retention is a very important benefits objective (MetLife)
  • 41% of employers ranked retention as their top employee benefits objective  (MetLife)
  • 40% of employed Americans are “completely satisfied” with the health insurance benefits their employer offers (Gallup)
  • 85% of employees report at least some level of financial stress (Financial Finesse)
  • 50% of employees strongly agree that because of the benefits they receive at work, they worry less about unexpected health and financial issues (MetLife)
  • 44% of Millennials are relying on their employers to ensure their financial security (MetLife)
  • 47% of US employers include financial well-being in their overall workforce well-being strategy; 80% expect to include it by 2018 (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 23% of employees who are satisfied with their benefits are likely to have been distracted at work by a personal issue (compared to 33% of those who are unsatisfied) (Aflac)
  • 50% of employers say that cost-sharing with employees is an important benefits strategy (MetLife)
  • 35% of employed Americans are “completely satisfied” with their chances for a promotion (Gallup)
  • 58% of employed Americans are “completely satisfied” with the flexibility of their hours (Gallup)
  • 48% of organizations offer community volunteer programs (SHRM)
  • 5% of employees say they use their company’s EAP (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 76% of employees reported a salary increase or promotion after completing an online certification (Simplilearn)
  • 72% of CFOs say their company covers some or all of the cost for staff to obtain professional certifications; 76% said their organization helps in maintaining credentials once earned (Robert Half)
  • 29% of CFOs say their organization offers no financial support for employees’ continuing education (Robert Half)
  • Benefits that employees say would increase engagement and loyalty: compensation (40%), better benefits (36%), career advancement opportunities (34%), training/education (31%), coworkers they like (18%), corporate culture (18%) (Workforce 2020)
  • 88% of executives and 85% of benefit managers agree that benefit programs have the most impact on improving employee loyalty as well as increasing employee engagement and lowering company medical costs (Wells Fargo)
  • Nearly 40% of employees say having a wide selection of benefits would make them feel more loyal to their employer (MetLife)
  • Most important factors in Millennial workplace selection: career advancement, salary, benefits, work-life balance and job security (Boston College)
  • Benefits students look for from employers: More than two weeks of vacation, Tuition reimbursement for advanced education, Promised annual salary increase, Company match for 401(k), Casual dress policy (NACE)
  • 61% of employers offer tuition reimbursement (SHRM)
  • 56% of organizations offer undergraduate educational assistance (SHRM)
  • 74% of employers claim cost is an important consideration in making benefits decisions (MetLife)
  • 26% of job offers are rejected due to benefits/salary not meeting expectations (MRI Network)
  • 43% of young women expect to make less than $35,000 in their first job, compared to 34% of men (Adecco Staffing)
  • Employees who spend less than 20% of their time working remotely are the most satisfied (Gallup)
  • 30% are “very satisfied” with their work-life benefits, and about 1 in 10 employees aren’t satisfied at all (Care.com)
  • 89% of working parents want family care benefits; 81% say their employers don’t offer any (Care.com)
  • 60% say their companies don’t appear to care about their child care needs (Care.com)
  • Among mothers who are currently employed either full or part time, 40% say they would prefer to work outside the home, and 54% would prefer to stay home (Gallup)
  • 22% of organizations allow employees to bring their children to work in a child care emergency (SHRM)
  • 73% of working adults agree that flexibility is one of the most important factors they consider when looking for a new job (Mom Corps)
  • 47% of working adults say asking for flexible work options would hurt their chances of job advancement (Mom Corps)
  • 39% of working adults have considered leaving or have left a job because it wasn’t flexible enough (Mom Corps)
  • 41% of working parents say the lack of family assistance-related benefits has hurt their work performance (Care.com)
  • 71% of senior staff agrees that telecommuting allows them to get more work done, compared to 51% of middle or staff level employees (CompTIA)
  • 58% of Americans believe remote workers are just as productive as those who work in a business office (Gallup)
  • 37% of U.S. workers say they have telecommuted (Gallup)
  • 60% of organizations offer some form of telecommuting (SHRM)
  • 75% of Millennials would prefer to work from home or other locations where they feel they could be most productive. However, only 43% currently are allowed to do this (Deloitte)
  • 66% of employees consider the office the most productive place to get work done; 36% say the office is the most “inspiring place” to work (Staples)
  • 44% of employees indicated flexible work arrangements as the No. 1 benefit they’d love to have at work (Virgin Pulse)
  • 30% of employees said they would take a 10% or 20% cut in pay in exchange for flexible work options (Flexjobs)
  • 24% of employees are willing to forfeit vacation time in exchange for flexible work options (Flexjobs)
  • 18% of employees would give up employer-matched retirement contributions in exchange for flexible work options (Flexjobs)
  • 10% of employees want a situation where they do not come into the office at all, and 35% do not want any telecommuting days at all (CompTIA)
  • 63% of Millennials say they’re more likely to join a company that offers the option to telecommute (along with 57% of GenX, 41% of Boomers) (CompTIA)
  • 44% of employees view companies that don’t offer a telecommuting option as old-fashioned (CompTIA)
  • 96% of employees reported having some type of flexibility (Flex+Strategy)
  • 97% of employees say a job with flexibility would have a positive impact on their overall quality of life (Flexjobs)
  • 19% of both Gen Z and Millennials say flexibility is their most important workplace benefit (Future Workplace)
  • Reasons why employees say they want flexible work options: Work-life balance (81%), Family (56%), Time savings (56%), Commute stress (48%) (Flexjobs)
  • Policies that would reduce voluntary turnover: Flexible schedules (51%), Increased recognition (awards, cash prizes, company trips) (50%), Acting on employee feedback (48%) (CareerBuilder)
  • More than one-third of employees would change companies for an employer that embraces flexible work (Unify)
  • 81% of Millennials think they should be allowed to make their own hours at work versus 69% of Boomers (MTV)
  • 90% of employees who plan vacations ahead of time are happy with their professional success; 87% are happy with their workplace (Project: Time Off)
  • Things workers are willing to sacrifice in order to have more happiness at work: a less private office space (76%), reduced workplace flexibility (60%), accept a lower position or title (60%) give up benefits such as their vacation time, accept a reduction on 401(K) contributions from an employer and other job perks (41%), take a pay cut (36%), relinquish health benefits (31%) (Spherion)
  • Retirement plans, flexibility and time-off rank well ahead of amenities such as fitness centers, daycare and subsidized food (Oxford Economics)
  • Most desired employee perks: Half-day Fridays (40%), On-site gym (20%), casual dress (18%) (CareerBuilder)
  • 22% of employers offer a casual dress code; 40% only relax dress codes on Fridays (IFEBP)
  • 70% of employees reported that increasing salaries is the best way to boost employee retention, 58% said better benefits (CareerBuilder)
  • 33% of organizations are offering higher salaries than they were last year (Randstad)
  • 80% of government workers are satisfied with the benefits that their employer offers (Gallup)
  • 57% of nongovernment workers are satisfied with the benefits that their employer offers (Gallup)
  • 68% of Millennials say compensation is the most important aspect of their workplace (Oxford Economics)
  • 68% of people say that salary and compensation is among their top considerations before accepting a job (Glassdoor)
  • 57% of people say benefits and perks are among their top considerations before accepting a job (Glassdoor)
  • 22% of employees say compensation is the major factor determining happiness in the workplace (Spherion)
  • 76% of Hiring Managers believe Millennials are motivated by money (Elance/Odesk)
  • 53% of Millennials say their biggest motivator is having the chance to work on exciting and interesting projects (Elance/Odesk)
  • 51% of millennials say benefits are where their current employer has the most room for improvement (Aon Hewitt)
  • 43% of employees expect a pay raise in the next 12 months (Glassdoor)
  • Of those who expect a pay raise, 49% expect it to be between 3-5% (Glassdoor)
  • 28% of employers believe “that most or all of their employees understand the company’s compensation philosophy.” (WorldatWork)
  • 82% of employers give out bonuses (WorldatWork)
  • 45% of companies offer spot bonuses/awards, or unscheduled bonuses for exceptional performance (SHRM)
  • 41% of Millennials say higher compensation would increase their loyalty and engagement with the company (Oxford Economics)
  • 39% of employees say higher compensation would increase loyalty and engagement with their current job (Oxford Economics)
  • Reasons why retirees return to the workforce, according to HR professionals: money (72%), occupying time (58%), health care benefits (45%), social interaction (42%) (SHRM)
  • 39% of executives say their company offers competitive compensation (Oxford Economics)
  • 78% said that the employee benefits package is very or extremely important in their decision to accept or reject a job (EBRI)
  • 31% of employees are only somewhat satisfied with the benefits offered by their current employer; 26% are not satisfied (EBRI)
  • 50% of employees are satisfied with their benefits (MetLife)
  • 15% of employees have taken a pay cut to work for a sustainable company (Bain & Co)
  • 38% of millennials say money would motivate them to work harder and stay with their employer longer (opportunities for advancement was cited by 30%, meaningful work 15%, good boss 7%, and working for a fast-growing company 6%) (Millennial Branding/Randstad)
  • 54% said career advancement opportunities are more important than salary when looking for work (Achievers)
  • 40% of employers are sending employees back to school to get an advanced degree (23% fund it partially, 12% fully funding) (CareerBuilder)
  • 68% of employers offer training programs; 71% offer soft skills and 72% offer hard skills (CareerBuilder)
  • Among companies with training programs, 11% say those budgets have been reduced over the past year; 39% report an increase, and 50% remained the same (SHRM)
  • 80% of 2016 grads expect their first employer to provide formal training (Accenture)
  • 54% of 2014 & 2015 grads received formal training from their first employer (Accenture)
  • The most common adaptions to accommodate millennials in the U.S. are making work hours more flexible (21%), allowing work from home (17%), increasing training (16%), implementing new mentoring programs (13%), and altering corporate culture (10%) (Duke/CFO)
  • 67% more Millennials than Baby Boomers say that “having a great mentor” at work is important (Atenga)
  • 32% of employees say their employer encourages them to work in different departments to gain additional experience and skills (Cornerstone)
  • Salary and “meaningful work” are the most important benefits potential employees look for (Millennial Branding/Beyond.com)
  • 78% of employees want a greater variety of benefits to choose from (MetLife)
  • 80% of employees would value benefits customized to individual circumstances and age (MetLife)
  • 77% of millennials say flexible work hours would make the workplace more productive for people their age (Bentley University)
  • 83% of Millennials ranked travel rewards as the number one reward that they would want most from an employer (Achievers)
  • 24% of workers did either some or all of their work at home in 2015 (Bureau of Labor Statistics)
  • 65% of employees think a flexible and remote work schedule would increase their productivity (Cornerstone)
  • 17% of employers offer seasonal scheduling (SHRM)
  • 68% of recent grads said the ability to work remotely at least some of the time would affect their likelihood to accept a position (After College)
  • 74% of millennials expect flexible schedules in the workplace (Deep Focus)
  • Only 19% of employees are allowed to work remotely by their employers (Cornerstone)
  • 50% of those under the age of 40 felt that a company’s approach to sustainable business practices have influenced their decision about accepting a job (Bain & Co)
  • Feeling encouraged by a supervisor to take breaks increases by nearly 100% people’s likelihood to stay with any given company, and also doubles their sense of health and well-being (The Energy Project)
  • Of the 79% who have no intention to change jobs, 54% cite liking the people they work with, 50% cite good work/life balance, and 49% cite good benefits as reasons for staying (CareerBuilder)
  • 43% of millennials would switch jobs for greater flexibility (Unify)
  • 74% of Millennials want flexible work schedules (Intelligence Group)
  • 50% of Millennials say flexible work hours and the freedom to work from any location would improve their work/life balance (RingCentral)
  • 59% of North America Millennials define work/life balance as “flexible work hours” (Universum)
  • 42% of North American Millennials are in favor of working long hours if it speeds up career progress (Universum)
  • 48% of millennials have been in their current job five years or longer (Clark University)
  • 33% of Millennials expect their employer to help repay existing student loans (EdAssist)
  • 4% of organizations offer student loan repayment benefits in 2016, a 1% rise since 2015 (SHRM)
  • 50% of Millennials expect financial support in paying for further education (EdAssist)
  • 69% of Millennials say the people whom they work with would enable their best work (Millennial Branding/Randstad)
  • 26% of workers said that providing special corporate perks is an effective way to improve employee retention (CareerBuilder)
  • 17% of organizations offer same-sex domestic partner benefits (excluding health care) (SHRM)
  • 26% of organizations offered family leave above required federal FMLA, and 22% provided family leave above any state FMLA requirements (SHRM)
  • 21% of organizations offer paid maternity leave (SHRM)
  • 57% of working dads feel they don’t spend enough quality time with their children during the week, and 87% want to be more involved with the family’s daily routine ([email protected])
  • 52% of working fathers feel their employers don’t do enough to support working parents ([email protected])
  • 95% of working fathers feel they should have paid paternity leave ([email protected])
  • 36% of men said they have no plans to use paternity leave benefits (Deloitte)
  • 57% of men with paternity leave benefits said that taking parental leave would show a lack of job commitment; 41% believed they would lose opportunities; 54% said colleagues would judge a man more harshly than a woman for taking the same amount of leave (Deloitte)
  • 64% of employers worldwide provide maternity leave for only the birth mother (Mercer)
  • 24% of employers provide parental leave to the primary caregiver regardless of gender (Mercer)
  • 41% of US employees spend half of their days off working or thinking about work (Adobe)
  • 91% of governmental workers say they are satisfied with their vacation time (Gallup)
  • 74% of nongovernmental workers say they are satisfied with their vacation time (Gallup)
  • 49% of households set aside time to plan vacations; these are 51% of them use all their vacation time (Project: Time Off)
  • The most important benefits and incentives to American employees are: competitive compensation (84%), retirement plans (75%), and vacation time (62%) (Oxford Economics)
  • 56% of Americans say they haven’t taken a vacation in the last 12 months, compared to 52%, who reported going without a vacation for a year in 2014 (Allianz)
  • 15% of Americans said they haven’t been on vacation in 7 to 12 months and 10% said it has been 4 to 6 months, with 16% saying they have been on vacation within the last 3 months (Allianz)
  • 99% of companies provide some form of paid vacation leave to their full-time employees (SHRM)
  • 86% of organizations provide between 6 and 20 vacation days to full-time employees on average, with 40% providing 11 to 15 days (SHRM)
  • 23% of Americans have no paid holidays (CEPR)
  • 98% of organizations offer paid holidays (SHRM)
  • 75% of Americans favor proposals that would require employers to provide seven days of sick leave, and two weeks of paid vacation (Gallup)
  • 75% of Americans favor of proposals that would require employers to provide seven days of sick leave, and two weeks of paid vacation (Gallup)
  • 73% of organizations offer six to 10 days of paid holidays to their full-time employees per year (SHRM)
  • 72% of organizations offered six to 10 days of paid holidays to part-time employees (SHRM)
  • 95% of organizations provide some form of paid sick leave to employees (SHRM)
  • 80% of all employers offer paid vacation to full-time W2 based employees, while just 13% offer these benefits to independent contractors (Burson Marsteller)
  • 43 million private sector workers have no sick days (National Partnership for Women & Families)
  • 39% of employees don’t believe their bosses encourage them to take allotted vacation days (Randstad)
  • 40% of workers who received paid vacation as a benefit did not use all of their available days in 2014 (Alamo)
  • 55% of employees left vacation days on the table in 2015 (Project: Time Off)
  • Americans used 73.8% of earned vacation time (16.2 days used of 21.9 days earned) in 2015 (Project: Time Off)
  • Americans lost 222 million vacation days (due to rollover, etc.) in 2015, resulting in $61.4 billion in forfeited benefits and free work for employers (Project: Time Off)
  • 26% of employees feel like they can’t turn off their job outside of work hours or even while on vacation (Cornerstone)
  • 19% of employees left five days or more of paid vacation unused last year (Alamo)
  • 38% of employees believe taking fewer vacations makes them look better in the eyes of their boss (Randstad)
  • 49% of employees feel stressed after they return from vacation (Randstad)
  • 46% of employees say they worry about work while on vacation (Randstad)
  • 34% of millennials work every day of their vacations (Alamo)
  • 95% of senior business leaders recognize the importance of using time off (US Travel Association)
  • 36% of employees have had to cancel vacation plans due to work (Randstad)
  • 65% of employees say they hear nothing, mixed messages, or discouraging message about taking time off (Project: Time Off)
  • 46% of employees say they receive no encouragement from managers or companies to take time off (Project: Time Off)
  • 31% of employees put pressure on themselves to work during vacation; 17% report pressure from bosses (Project: Time Off)
  • 45% of managers put pressure on themselves to check in with the office during time off, 25% of them feel like their boss expects them to (Project: Time Off)
  • 32% of managers never talk about the importance of taking time off (Project: Time Off)
  • 25% of employees are unsure or agree that their employer wants them to work on vacation (Project: Time Off)
  • 80% of employees would take more time off if encouraged by their boss (Project: Time Off)
  • 58% of employees sense a lack of time off support from their boss; 53% sense a lack of support from colleagues (Project: Time Off)
  • 24% of employees say their manager is most influential in taking time off; family was cited by 23% (Project: Time Off)
  • 41% of employees do not plan to use all their paid time off this year (US Travel Association)
  • 89% of employees said PTO influenced their employer choice and job satisfaction (TriNet)
  • 33% of employees feel they don’t have enough vacation time (Accountemps)
  • Baby boomers were twice as likely (26%) to say they need four weeks or more off work than millennials (13%) (TriNet)
  • 41% of Americans didn’t take a single vacation day in 2015 (Skift)
  • 33% of employees say they cannot afford to use their PTO (US Travel Association)
  • 46% of employees respond to emails while taking PTO; 29% return calls from work (US Travel Association)
  • 61% of Americans work while they’re on vacation despite repeated complaints from members of their family; one-in-four are contacted by a colleague about a work-related matter while taking time off, while one-in-five have been contacted by their boss (Glassdoor)
  • 37% of senior business leaders reported unplugging entirely from work during PTO , compared to 74% of employees (US Travel Association)
  • Americans who used all of their paid vacation were more likely to unplug while on their trips (54% vs. 37%) with 40% stating they are more productive when they return to work (Alamo)
  • Employees only use 51% of their eligible paid vacation time and paid time off (Glassdoor)
  • 40% of employees feel they can’t justify taking time off due to workload, 13% are intimidated by work piling up while they’re gone (Oxford Economics)
  • The biggest reasons why employees don’t use all their vacation time: returning to a mountain of work (37%), no one else can do the job (30%), the higher you rise in a company the harder it is to take time off (28%), and wanting to show complete dedication to the company and job (22%) (Project: Time Off)
  • 41% of employees say they have skipped vacations (or taken fewer days off) out of fear that their work would pile up while gone (Accountemps)
  • 41% of employees check in with the office at least once or twice a week while on vacation (Accountemps)
  • 36% of employees ages 18-34 check in with the office at least once or twice a day while on vacation (Accountemps)
  • 35% of employees took less or no days off because they worried about the effect it would have on co-workers (Accountemps)
  • 40% of women said they don’t have enough vacation time, compared to 26% of men (Accountemps)
  • 56% of employees say their vacation allotment is just right, 33% say it’s not enough, 11% say they have too much (Accountemps)
  • 57% of employed Americans are “completely satisfied” with the amount of vacation time they receive (Gallup)
  • One in four U.S adults (24.6%) receive company emails on their mobile device (Samanage)
  • Young Millennials age 18-24 (25.1%) and older Millennials age 25-34 (29.2%) are more than twice as likely to get company emails on their mobile device compared to Baby Boomers age 65+ (12.2%) (Samanage)
  • 19.2% of employees very often wake up to check email (Samanage)
  • 36.8% of employees checked work emails during dinner, just not recently, and 23.6% very often check work emails during dinner (Samanage)
  • 63.6% of Baby Boomers (ages 65+) said they have never checked work emails during dinner (Samanage)
  • 35.2% of employes spend more than 1 hour checking email outside of work (Samanage)
  • 10.5% of employees check work email after hours because their boss or client expects it  (Samanage)
  • 67% of Americans favor increased overtime eligibility (Gallup)
  • 20% of U.S. adults admitted negative feelings, including feeling overwhelmed and frustrated, toward checking email outside of work (Samanage)
  • 68% of workers say training and development is the most important workplace policy, followed by working hours flexibility (74%), promotion of health at work (72%) (EdenRed)
  • Executives cite a high level of education or institutional training as the most important employee attribute, only 23% say they offer development and training as a benefit (Oxford Economics)
  • 84% of organizations offer their staff some form of professional development opportunities (SHRM)
  • 91% of organizations offer paid professional memberships (SHRM)
  • 42% of organizations offer cross-training to develop skills not directly related to employees’ current jobs (SHRM)
  • 46% of employees say their company’s training courses/methods make them less likely to leave (CompTIA)
  • The percentage of employers with fewer than 100 workers that offer healthcare benefits to their employees has declined an average of 24% since 2008 (Employee Benefit Research Institute)
  • % of employees offered the following benefits: health insurance (76%), retirement savings plan (67%), dental insurance (66%), vision insurance (60%), life insurance (58%), short-term disability insurance (55%), long-term disability insurance (49%), AD&D (48%), pension (38%), long-term care insurance (25%), retiree insurance (22%) (EBRI)
  • %of employees who accept the following benefits: health insurance (83%), life insurance (81%), dental (80%), retirement savings plan (80%), pension (76%), vision insurance (73%), short-term disability (71%), AD&D (70%), long-term disability (66%) (EBRI)
  • 83% of organizations offer company paid group life insurance, 58% offered life insurance for dependents, and 21% offered accelerated death benefits (SHRM)
  • 78% of employees rate health insurance in their top two most desired benefits, 37% rate retirement savings plan in their top two (down from 67% in 1999), 26% rate PTO (up from 16% in 2004), traditional pensions were rated by 13% (down from 21% in 1999) (EBRI)
  • 92% of employers offer a 401(k), 402(b) or similar plan (SHRM)
  • An average of 66% of employees participated in 401(k) or similar plans (SHRM)
  • 82% of government employees say they are “completely” or “somewhat satisfied” with their retirement plan (Gallup)
  • 35% of employed Americans are “completely satisfied” with the retirement plan offered (Gallup)
  • 57% of nongovernment employees say they are “completely” or “somewhat satisfied” with their retirement plan (Gallup)
  • Retirement plan participation has increased 19% in the past five years (Wells Fargo)
  • 62% of employees say they would be willing to pay more out of their paychecks for more generous retirement benefits (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 23% of employees believe they’ll have to work past age 70 to live comfortably in retirement; another 5% don’t think they’ll ever be able to retire (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 78% of millennials are on track to replace 80% of their pay in retirement, compared to 62% for Generation X and 50% for baby boomers (Wells Fargo)
  • 23% of employees under the age of 35 consider retirement on a weekly basis, compared to 27% of those 25-49 and 45% of those 50+ (OneAmerica)
  • 96% of organizations offer dental coverage to their employees (SHRM)
  • 87% of employers offer a mail-order prescription program (SHRM)
  • 30% of organizations offer employer contributions to HSAs, a 10 percentage point increase over the last five years (SHRM)
  • Of employers who offer an HSA, 79% fund at least part of the account (Conrad Siegel)
  • 38% of employees are not very confident they made the right benefits decisions at annual enrollment (MetLife)
  • 54% of employees claim they need more help understanding how their benefits work, and how those benefits can help meet their needs (MetLife)
  • 43% of millennials and 30% of non-millennials are not reading most of their employee benefits handbooks; 11% of millennials haven’t even opened their handbooks (GuideSpark)
  • 23% of millennials and 36% of non-millennials don’t know where their benefit handbooks are anymore (GuideSpark)
  • 45% of employees strongly agree their companies’ benefit communications helped them to understand how they would pay for specific services and effectively educated them on their benefit options (MetLife)
  • 88% of HR managers cite cost control as a very important benefits objective, 80% say optimizing benefits plans to reduce costs is a most important strategy (MetLife)
  • 48% of employees are unsatisfied with their employers’ investments in wellness and preventative care (One Medical)
  • Engaged workers are 28% more likely than their actively disengaged peers to get involved in company-sponsored wellness programs (Gallup)
  • 53% of employees would participate in an exercise program through their workplace to help lower their health insurance cost (Aflac)
  • 44% of employees say the climate in their organization supports employee well-being (American Psychological Association)
  • 33% of employees participate in workplace wellness or well-being programs (Flex+Strategy)
  • 33% of U.S. workers say they regularly participate in employer-provided health promotion programs (American Psychological Association)
  • 66% of companies see an ROI on their health and performance initiatives; 35% report improved productivity and 34% cite improved morale (Hub International)
  • By 2018, 64% of U.S. employers will focus on developing workplace cultures that support employee well-being as a primary strategy to boost health engagement (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 56% of employers ask employees what’s missing from their well-being experience (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 35% of US employers invite family members to participate in well-being programs and activities (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 51% of employers say their senior leaders are visible champions of the organization’s health and well-being strategy (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 70% of employers have improved their physical environments to encourage healthy behaviors, including adding healthy foods to cafeteria menus, walking paths and campus bike-sharing programs (Willis Towers Watson)
  • 20% of employees said even though their company provides a wellness program, they do not participate; 25% said wellness/wellbeing programming is not an option at their workplace (Flex+Strategy)
  • 73% of employees with senior managers who show support through involvement and commitment to wellbeing initiatives said their organization helps employees develop a healthy lifestyle (American Psychological Association)
  • 91% of workers at companies that support well-being efforts say they feel motivated to do their best (American Psychological Association)
  • 91% of workers at companies that support well-being efforts are satisfied with their job (American Psychological Association)
  • 91% of workers at companies that support well-being efforts have a positive relationship with supervisors (American Psychological Association)
  • 93% of workers at companies that support well-being efforts have a positive relationship with co-workers (American Psychological Association)
  • 89% of workers at companies that support well-being efforts are more likely to recommend their company as a good place to work (American Psychological Association)
  • 25% of workers at companies that support well-being efforts said they intend to leave their job in the next year (American Psychological Association)
  • 40% of working Americans said their senior managers are involved in and committed to well-being initiatives (American Psychological Association)
  • 61% of employees agree that they’ve made healthier lifestyle choices because of their company’s wellness program (Aflac)
  • 26.3% of organizations planned to add wellness rewards and penalties in 2015 (SHRM)
  • 81% of large employers and 49% of small employers offer employees programs to help them stop smoking, lose weight, or make other lifestyle or behavioral changes (Kaiser Family Foundation)
  • 40% of organizations offered rewards or bonuses for completing certain health and wellness activities (SHRM)
  • 80% of organizations provide wellness resources and information, and 70% offered wellness programs (SHRM)
  • Among employees working at organizations with a wellness program, 43% say they are “actively involved” in the program (Modern Survey)
  • 46% of organizations that provide health care coverage to their employees have increased employee participation in preventive health and wellness initiatives to control health care costs (SHRM)
  • 46% of Millennials would be more likely to make a donation to a corporate giving program if a coworker encouraged them to (Case Foundation)
  • Just 27% of Millennials would be more likely to donate to a CSR program if a direct supervisor suggested that they do so, 21% if the CEO asked (Case Foundation)
  • 84% of Millennials made a corporate donation in 2014, 22% of those who gave said at least part of it was done through solicitation from an employer (Case Foundation)
  • 60% of employees are willing to bear more of the cost in order to have a choice of benefits that meet their needs (MetLife)
  • 95% of employees prefer to select their own benefits rather than have their employers choose for them (Liazon)
  • Eight in ten full-time employees would be motivated to use company-provided wearable tech that allows employers to track their health and wellness data (Cornerstone)
  • 20% of employers have made adjustments in their offices to improve employee health and wellness (Work Design)
  • 29% of health benefit plan sponsors offer a price comparison tool (HealthMine)
  • 42% of employee in wellness programs say having a price comparison tool in their wellness program is “very important,” and 48% said it would be “nice to have.” (HealthMine)
  • 81% of wellbeing program participants saw a positive impact on their physical well-being (Welltok)
  • 62% of wellness program participants said it helped them lower their healthcare costs (HealthMine)
  • 38% of wellness program participants said it helped them take fewer sick days (HealthMine)
  • 33% of wellness program participants said it helped them be more productive at work (HealthMine)
  • 86% of employees ranked their colleagues as one of the top motivators to improving their overall health and well-being at work, 57% cited their direct manager (Welltok)
  • 64% of Millennials said their direct managers as a top influence to improve their overall health (Welltok)
  • Employees 55 or older cited direct managers (51%) and HR (40%) as top motivators in improving overall health (Welltok)
  • 60% of employees between 18 and 34 thought employers should be involved in financial health, less than half of those 45 and older agreed (Welltok)
  • 25% of employees say their company’s health and wellness programs are actually making them healthier (One Medical)
  • 37% of employees who don’t participate in wellness programs did not find them personally relevant and 20% didn’t know they were available (Welltok)
  • 66% of employees say their wellness program does not include a medical test for nicotine use (HealthMine)
  • 48% of employees believe that colleagues who smoke should pay a penalty (HealthMine)
  • 57% of wellness programs do not include smoking cessation (HealthMine)
  • 11% of employees currently participate in a smoking cessation program through their wellness plan (HealthMine)
  • 80% of employees said they wouldn’t be likely to complete a smoking cessation program without a financial incentive; 34% said their programs offer financial incentives (HealthMine)
  • 22% of survey participants currently have mindfulness programs and 21% are thinking about introducing one in 2017 (National Business Group on Health)
  • 41% of employee who don’t compare costs before scheduling services, 41% said it is because the “cost is covered by my health plan, so it doesn’t matter.” (HealthMine)
  • 72% of employees who choose their benefits through a private exchange say they are more likely to stay with their employer because of their benefits program (Liazon)
  • 77% of employees who choose their benefits through a private exchange value their benefits more (Liazon)
  • 81% of employees value their company’s contribution to their benefits more after moving to a private exchange (Liazon)
  • 83% of employees became more engaged in their health care decisions after moving to a private exchange (Liazon)
  • If it means controlling costs without reducing benefits, 44% of employers would be inclined to switch to a private healthcare exchange (Liazon)
  • 57.8% of employers are “not confident” that private exchanges will provide a viable alternative to current methods of providing health coverage to active employees; no respondents stated they were “very confident” (Pacific Resources)
  • 64.4% of employers say “reduce company costs” would be the top reason to consider moving to an exchange (Pacific Resources)
  • 82.6% of employers say they have a thorough or basic knowledge of the opportunities, challenges and decisions required to move to a private exchange (Pacific Resources)
  • 28.9% of employers have conducted an evaluation and decided not to move active employees to a private exchange (Pacific Resources)
  • 13% of organizations offer employer-sponsored personal shopping discounts (SHRM)
  • 30% of organizations offer discount ticket service (SHRM)
  • 79% of Millennials think they should be allowed to wear jeans to work (at least sometimes) versus 60% of Boomers (MTV)
  • 36% of companies offer casual dress every day, 62% offer it one day per week (SHRM)
  • 27% of employers allow seasonal casual dress (SHRM)
  • 57% of IT employees see affordable benefits as more important than salary (CareerBuilder)
  • 8% of companies offer a paid day off for the employee’s birthday (SHRM) 
  • 45% of companies offer a phone subsidy for business use of employees’ personal phones (SHRM)
  • 34% of organizations provide employee discounts on company services (SHRM)
  • 64% of employers offer an annual company outing (SHRM)
  • 30% of employers offered discount ticket services (SHRM)
  • 23% offered company purchased tickets to events such as cultural proceedings, sporting events or theme parks (SHRM)
  • 86% of organizations reported offering paid bereavement leave (SHRM)
  • 76% of organizations provide free coffee (SHRM)
  • 66% of employees whose offices provide free snacks or beverages report being extremely or very happy with their current job (PeaPod)
  • 83% of employees agree “having healthy and fresh snack options (e.g., fruit, vegetables, yogurt, low-calorie snacks) provided in the workplace is a “huge” perk (PeaPod)
  • 66% of millennials agree “If I found or was offered a job at another company with better perks, including availability of snacks, I would take it.” (PeaPod)
  • 37% of organizations offer acupressure/acupuncture medical coverage (SHRM)
  • 91% of organizations offer mental health coverage to their employees (SHRM)
  • 88% of organizations offer on-site parking, 10% offer parking subsidies (SHRM)
  • 70% of organizations allow employees to retain frequent flyer miles (SHRM)
  • 8% of companies allow pets at the office (SHRM)
  • 2% of organizations offered nap rooms in 2015 (SHRM)
  • Highest paying companies in America, 2016: A.T. Kearney, Strategy&, Juniper Networks, McKinsey & Co., Google; 24 of 25 are in consulting or technology (Glassdoor)