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How to build an effective learning organisation

Professor Shlomo Ben-Hur demonstrates how corporate learning can and should have an integral, strategic, role in a company.

How to build an effective learning organisation

At an IMD Discovery Event, Shlomo Ben-Hur and guest contributors shared their research on corporate learning and how to build an effective learning organization based on their work with various companies. Participants took part in research, shared their practices, and walked away with action plans for their own improvement.
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Discovery Events are exclusively available to members of IMD’s Corporate Learning Network. To find out more, go to www.imd.org/cln.

The Business of Corporate Learning: Insights from Practice

Shlomo Ben-Hur

By Professor Shlomo Ben-Hur
Corporate learning functions are now an established part of many of the world’s leading multinational firms.
In this book, Shlomo Ben-Hur demonstrates how corporate learning can and should have an integral, strategic, role in a company.
Based on first hand experience, Ben-Hur provides a practical guide to setting up or restructuring a corporate learning function within a company, covering its seven key activities. He identifies and elucidates the key decision points in this process.But The Business of Corporate Learning is much more than a ‘how-to’ guide. For the first time, this book sheds light on the reasons for success or failure in the strategic deployment of corporate learning.Real-world case studies are used to illustrate the potential pitfalls and demonstrate how – when successfully integrated into the company’s strategic management system – corporate learning is able to deliver tangible business results.
Cambridge University Press ● Hardback ● ISBN 9781107027008

Buy hard copy or Kindle eBook

Executive Education Impact

Despite a continued corporate call for business schools to objectively prove the impact of their executive education programs, the use of activities to ensure and measure such impact remains limited.

In this article, Professor Bettina Buechel explains how this failure is due to risk-averse behavior by business school Faculty and HR executives, and how to improve program impact.

Learn more >